background image

Adopting Sustainable Practices for Your Business

Just like everyday consumers, many small and midsize businesses have become increasingly conscientious about environmental sustainability. If you’ve already made energy-efficient upgrades to your business property, you may be interested in doing more.

Adopting the following sustainable practices could be a great way to focus on corporate social responsibility. Many of these practices are easy and affordable to implement, and they can be key to your efforts to preserve natural resources and create a healthier work environment for your staff. As an added benefit, some of these tips could lead to cost savings as well.  

Enhance Water Efficiency

In recent years, many parts of the country have seen some of their driest years on record. Smart water management is more important than ever. Use water meters and low-flow fixtures at your facility, and be sure to monitor your water use for any sanitary, landscaping, and business processes. Also, incorporate native and drought-tolerant plants around your facility.

Say Yes to Paperless  

Share documents electronically whenever possible. When you do need paper, be as efficient as possible.

  • Buy paper products certified by the Forest Stewardship Council with the highest percentage of postconsumer recycled content and wood fiber.
  • Use double-sided printing and copying.
  • Always remember to recycle, and make it easy for your employees to do the same.

Improve Indoor Air Quality

Better air quality can lead to an improvement in overall workplace wellness.

  • Schedule regular maintenance of your HVAC system.
  • Use a vacuum with a HEPA filter to eliminate common allergens, like pollen and dust mites, and consider bringing in a HEPA air purifier as well.
  • Test for common indoor pollutants like radon.
  • Open windows to ensure adequate ventilation whenever possible.
  • Use a dehumidifier and air conditioner to keep indoor humidity between 30 and 50 percent to keep mold and other allergens at bay.

Consider Updating Company Vehicles   

In the market for new cars or trucks? Choose models with high fuel economy. Along with lowering energy consumption and emissions, you could enjoy valuable savings on fuel costs. Also, set up a no-idling policy for all vehicles on your property.

Recycle & Reuse

Think beyond paper by recycling aluminum cans, glass, and plastic bottles, and recycle used ink cartridges at your local office supply store. Also, set up clear processes in your workplace to ensure your whole team participates in sorting recycling as needed, based on the requirements of your community or recycling service.

Even better than recycling? Reusing existing materials. Put old cardboard boxes to use for storage and shipping, and repair broken equipment to extend its usefulness. Keep old computers, electronics, and other property out of the landfill by donating them to a local nonprofit for a potential tax deduction when filing taxes (make sure your donations are documented).

Lower the Impact of Your Facility

There are lots of easy, low-cost ways to help maximize your building’s efficiency when it comes to things like heating, air conditioning, and lighting. These include simple steps like installing programmable thermostats and lighting with sensors, which reduce energy consumption outside of business hours. Also, install weather-stripping or caulk around windows, doors, and outlets if necessary.

If you’re planning to open a new business location, find a site that’s accessible by public transportation to reduce the impact of commuting employees. Also, consider offering a remote-work option to employees, when feasible, to help lower the energy consumption of your facility.

Looking to update your vehicle fleet, make energy-efficient facility upgrades, or complete other capital improvements? Talk to your local Royal Credit Union business lender to discuss your needs and find a business financing solution that fits your goals.

 

This information is for general informational purposes only and does not constitute tax, legal, or business advice.  Business loans are subject to credit review and approval.